Access HS/HSL Resources Easily!

If you are a UMB faculty, staff, or student and are on-campus (in a UMB building) you can search for journal articles and books online, no need to log in with your UMID and password or to go to the HS/HSL homepage. You will be recognized by your IP address.

If you are off-campus, go to the HS/HSL homepage to log in. See the big blue Off-Campus Access button in the upper right-hand corner of our page? Click and enter your UMID and password for full-text access to journals we subscribe to.

Using Google Scholar off-campus? To get to full-text easily make sure you do a quick settings change.

Look at the upper left-hand corner of Google Scholar, click on the 3 parallel lines icon and you will see a link to Settings, click, then choose Library Links.

Type Maryland into the search bar and then choose the Health Sciences and Human Services Library, Univ of Maryland (Find It @ HS/HSL) and click Save.

Now, when searching Google Scholar you will now see a link on the right-hand side when you come to an article that the HS/HSL subscribes to.

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UMB Ties to the Hospital Ship USNS Comfort

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library Historical Collections’ strives to provide broad access to our diverse collections both in person and digitally. Materials in our collections appear as they originally were published or created and may contain offensive or inappropriate language or images and may be offensive to users. The University of Maryland, Baltimore does not endorse the views expressed in these materials. Materials should be viewed in the context within they were created.

Photograph of the USNS Comfort hospital ship in Baltimore's Port.

USNS Comfort docked in Baltimore, 2010. Image from Wikimedia Commons.

On March 30, 2020 the USNS Comfort arrived in New York City’s Harbor on a mission to provide assistance to the city’s overwhelmed hospitals in the midst of the Coronavirus Pandemic.  The USNS Comfort is a Navy Hospital Ship with 1,000 beds and 12 operating rooms, which has been deployed in times of crisis and peace around the world.  The USNS Comfort is stationed in Norfolk, VA but for a significant portion of her life (1988-2013) as a hospital ship, she was stationed in Baltimore’s Port.  The location is not her only ties to the city of Baltimore, as several UMB alumni and faculty served on this hospital ship during her 33-year history. 

Photograph of Dr. H.G. Knapp

Dr. H.G. Robert Knapp, School of Medicine Class of 1946, from the 1946 Reflexions Yearbook. Following graduation Dr. Knapp served on the USNS Comfort.

The USNS Comfort is actually the third Navy ship christened with the name Comfort.  The first Comfort (USS Comfort AH-3) was a repurposed passenger and Army transport ship that was transferred to the Navy during World War I (1918-1921) and commissioned as a hospital ship.  This USS Comfort, like the current Comfort, was stationed in New York’s Harbor to support the hospitals during the 1918 Flu Pandemic.  However, it was primarily used to transport wounded soldiers across the Atlantic following World War I.

The second ship christened the USS Comfort (AH-6) served the Navy as a hospital ship during World War II.  Following the war the ship was transferred to the Army.  It was on this Comfort that Dr. H.G. Robert Knapp, University of Maryland School of Medicine Class of 1946, served as Chief Medical Officer treating patients returning from Germany and Japan following the war.  Dr. Knapp achieved the rank of Captain in the Army.  After being discharged Dr. Knapp opened a private practice in Orthopedics and taught at the University of Arkansas.  Dr. Knapp passed away in 2010.

Photograph of Commander Barbara Vernoski hugging her husband and daughter before boarding the USNS Comfort in 1990.

Commander Barbara Vernoski, graduate of the School of Nursing, hugging her husband and daughter before deploying on the USNS Comfort during Desert Storm, 1990. Image from Navy Medicine Vol. 81, No. 5.

The current USNS Comfort is a converted oil tanker; it was transferred to the Navy in 1987.  The USNS Comfort served in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm in the 1990s.  During this deployment, Commander Barbara Vernoski, Lt. Commander Barbara Schmitz, and Lt. Commander Elana Schavalend, all graduates of the University of Maryland School of Nursing, served onboard. Schmitz served as head of the Burn Unit on the ship and shared her experiences of wartime nursing with The Washington Post in 1990, “Some people felt like they didn’t do enough when they died, even though we did everything we could.  It’s different at home – when they die they’re 90.  Here I’m writing the ages – 20, 22, 25 is the oldest.”

Photograph of Eddie Lopez

Lt. Commander, Eddie Lopez, School of Nursing graduate in 2002, served on the USNS Comfort in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake. From the 2010 Nursing magazine.

The USNS Comfort was also deployed to New York’s Harbor following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.  During that deployment it served as a place for emergency workers to get medical care, rest, and showers while sifting through the rubble.  In 2005, the ship was sent to aid Hurricane Katrina victims in the Gulf Coast and in 2010 it was sent to Haiti to provide medical aid to those injured in the earthquake.  While in Haiti, Eddie Lopez, University of Maryland School of Nursing Masters Graduate in 2002, served as Lt. Commander on the vessel.  Lopez reflected on his time onboard in a 2011 School of Nursing publication, “We worked 16-hour days with limited supplies. It was disaster medicine, which means you just do the best you can with what you have.”

Photograph of Doctors Brian Kirkwood and Andrew Pakchoian before a mission on the USNS Comfort

Drs. Brian Kirkwood and Andrew Pakchoian, School of Dentistry, served as dental students on the USNS Comfort during a peacetime deployment to the Caribbean in 2009. Image from the May 2009 Voice.

The USNS Comfort has also been deployed in peacetime missions as it was in 2009, when Brian Kirkwood and Andrew Pakchoian, then third-year students in the School of Dentistry, served with Dr. Patricia Meehan, assistant dean of admissions and recruitment, and Dr. Gary Hack, professor, on board the ship.  In the mission, the members of the Dental School traveled throughout the Caribbean to work with other students and faculty from dental schools in the region on digital dentistry. 

In 2013, the USNS Comfort left its home in Baltimore for the last time and was transferred to the Naval Station in Norfolk, VA, ending a 25-year history with the city.  During that time, medical personnel, including several from the schools at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, saved thousands of lives. 

References:

“A Mother’s Duty.” (10 Sept. 1990). People Weekly. 34(10). Retrieved from: https://people.com/archive/cover-story-a-mothers-duty-vol-34-no-10/.

Berberich, S. (May 2009). Voice. 29(8):12. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/10883

Chappell, B. (30 Mar. 2020). “Hospital Ship USNS Comfort Arrives in New York to Ease Coronavirus Pressure.” NPR Website. Retrieved from: https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/03/30/823826987/hospital-ship-usns-comfort-arrives-in-new-york-to-ease-coronavirus-pressure.

“Comfort and Joy.” (18 Dec. 1990). Voice. 8(9): 12. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/10320.

DeMetrick, A. (26 Feb. 2013). “USNS Comfort Departs Baltimore for the Final Time.” WJZ13 CBS Baltimore Website. Retrieved from: https://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2013/02/26/usns-comfort-departs-baltimore-for-the-final-time/.

“H.G. Robert Knapp.” (2012). Bulletin of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. 96(3):34. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/3592.

“Historical Note.” (02 May 2019). Records Relating to Hospital Ships and USNS Comfort during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, 1906-1991. Finding aid at Naval History and Heritage Command Website. Retrieved from: https://www.history.navy.mil/research/archives/research-guides-and-finding-aids/hospital-ships-and-usns-comfort-1906-1991.html.

Krause, P. (2011). Nursing. 5(1): 39. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/4513

Navy Medicine. (1990). 81(5):Cover.  Retrieved from: https://archive.org/details/NavyMedicineVol.81No.5September-october1990/mode/2up.

Moore, M. (08 Nov. 1990). “D.C. Trauma Trains Medic for the Gulf.” The Washington Post. Washington D.C.: a01. Retrieved from ProQuest: https://search.proquest.com/docview/307332972?accountid=57689.

Patani, A. (02 Nov. 2018). “Legacy of USNS Comfort.” The Sextant. Official Blog of Naval History and Heritage Command. Retrieved from: https://usnhistory.navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/11/02/legacy-of-usns-comfort/.

Sobocinski, A. (27 Mar. 2020). “Navy Hospital Ships Have History of Answering Nation’s Call.” U.S. Department of Defense Website. Retrieved from: https://www.defense.gov/Explore/Features/Story/Article/2128626/navy-hospital-ships-have-history-of-answering-nations-call/.

 

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HS/HSL 3D Printing for Health Care Workers in Response to COVID-19

3D printed headband sets for medical face shields

Here is an update on our progress so far:

  • 20 face shield headband sets have been delivered to the local MD Makers Unite effort (based at Open Works here in Baltimore). There they will be sanitized and assembled with clear plastic sheets into face shields. Printing continues.
  • A living guide has been set up with information for health care workers and for those who would like to join the effort to produce more personal protective equipment (PPE) https://guides.hshsl.umaryland.edu/ppe
  • We’re helping the UMMC’s Infectious Disease Department procure some of the crowd made PPE. #VictoryPrints!
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UMB in WWII: the classes of 1943M and 1943D

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library Historical Collections’ strives to provide broad access to our diverse collections both in person and digitally. Materials in our collections appear as they originally were published or created and may contain offensive or inappropriate language or images and may be offensive to users. The University of Maryland, Baltimore does not endorse the views expressed in these materials. Materials should be viewed in the context within they were created.

Drawing from the end sheets of the School of Pharmacy's Yearbook for 1944.  The drawing depicts a pharmacy graduate in cap and gown on the left and the right shows two directions for that pharmacist to go.  One in war, the other on the homefront.

End sheets of the School of Pharmacy’s 1944 Yearbook: Terra Mariae.

On March 26, Dr. Bruce Jarrell, the University of Maryland Baltimore’s (UMB) Interim President, released a video to the Class of 2020.  In the video, Dr. Jarrell, refers to the uniqueness of the 1943 School of Medicine graduating classes and how they had to overcome unusual circumstances surrounding World War II.  World War II began in September 1939, with Germany’s invasion of Poland; however, the United States did not officially become involved in the conflict until after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. 

Not surprisingly, doctors, dentists, nurses, and pharmacists were needed in large numbers to support both the war effort and the home front.  To meet this unprecedented demand, UMB began offering year-round school in the fall of 1942 in all schools.  This meant an accelerated school year with no extended summer break or long holidays.  The schools graduated students in three calendar years rather than four academic years and new classes were admitted every nine months.  Most schools also had programs where qualified students could receive commissions in either the Army or Navy and graduate with higher military standing.  The School of Nursing, School of Medicine, and University Hospital also contributed personnel to the 42nd and 142nd general hospitals on the Pacific Front. 

As a result of the accelerated academic year, for the first time the Schools of Medicine and Dentistry graduated two classes in 1943.  In the School of Medicine, the first 98 students graduated at the “normal” time on March 25, 1943 (1943 M); the second class of 90 students graduated on December 23, 1943 (1943 D).  Similarly, the School of Dentistry graduated 83 students in March, while 76 students graduated in December.  For the first time, the School of Dentistry produced two yearbooks for the graduating class; the yearbooks are filled with remembrances and frustrations with the wartime schedule.  The future that lie ahead of these graduating doctors and dentists is described by Stanley H. Karesh, SOD Class of 1943 D, in the December 1943 Mirror Yearbook; he states, “As the first class to graduate in uniform, the first class to accelerate appreciably, and as dentists who expect to see action in this war, we review with pride the time and effort spent in achieving our purpose.  We entered to learn; we go forth to serve.”  Dr. Karesh went on to serve in the US Naval Reserve Dental Corps during World War II. 

World War II ended in the fall of 1945 soon after the atomic bombings of the Japanese cities of Nagasaki and Hiroshima.  With the end of the war, the accelerated programs ended as well.  Below is a chart of the number of graduates from 1943 to 1945 for each of the UMB Schools.

School

Number of Graduates 1943-1945

Dentistry

296

Medicine

365

Nursing

144

Pharmacy

74

 

References (all available in the HS/HSL’s Digital Archive):

Annual Catalogue: Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland. (1942). School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Retrieved from: http://www.archive.org/details/dentistr53unse.

Bulletin of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. (1943). School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/4321.

Bulletin of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. (1944). School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/4322.

Bulletin of the School of Medicine University of Maryland: Announcements. (1942). School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/2624. [Academic Catalog]

Catalog and 99th Announcement: Including Accelerated Wartime Program. (1942). School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/2216.

Innovation in Action: The University of Maryland School of Nursing from its Founding in 1889 to 2012. (2014). School of Nursing, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/7106.

Mirror. (March 1943). School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/386.

Mirror. (December 1943). School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/387.

“Reunion ’92.” (1992). Bulletin of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore. 77(2): 22, 30-33. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/1609.

Terra Mariae. (1944). School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/2380.

 

 

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Dr. Maureen Henderson, First Woman Chair of the Department of Preventive Medicine, 1971-1975

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library Historical Collections’ strives to provide broad access to our diverse collections both in person and digitally. Materials in our collections appear as they originally were published or created and may contain offensive or inappropriate language or images and may be offensive to users. The University of Maryland, Baltimore does not endorse the views expressed in these materials. Materials should be viewed in the context within they were created.

Photograph of Dr. Maureen Henderson, 1972

Dr. Maureen Henderson, Chair of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, 1971-1975. Image from Bulletin of the School of Medicine, 1972.

Rounding out our celebration of Women’s History Month 2020 is Dr. Maureen Henderson.  Dr. Henderson joined the faculty at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) in 1960 as an instructor. She was born in Tynemouth, England in 1926 to Dr. Leo E. and Helen McGrath Henderson.  She was a graduate in medicine and public health from the University of Durham, England. 

After joining the UMSOM faculty in 1960, she earned the title of Professor of Preventive Medicine in 1968 and was named Chair of the Department in December of 1971.  At the time, she was the first woman to hold the title of Chair at Maryland’s medical school and one of few women chairs in schools of medicine around the country. As Chair, Dr. Henderson oversaw seventy faculty members across three divisions.  Soon after accepting the title of chair, the department changed its name to the Department of Social and Preventive Medicine in 1974.  The name change was a direct result of Dr. Henderson adding new expertise to the department including the focus of Social Medicine and Public Health.

In 1975, Dr. Henderson resigned her position to accept a position as Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine as well as Associate Vice President for Health Affairs at the University of Washington.  In 1983, she founded the Cancer Prevention Research Program at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, holding the position of director there until 1994.  In 1997, Dr. Henderson was awarded the Order of the British Empire, the highest civilian award given by the British Government for her research in Cancer Prevention.  She retired in 1998.

Dr. Henderson died December 4, 2012 in Seattle Washington.  She was a world-renowned Epidemiologist and expert on cancer prevention but also studied cardiac disease, pregnancy complications, hypertension, and stroke. 

 

Sources:

“Dr. Maureen McGrath Henderson.” (2012). Legacy.com Obituary. Retrieved from: https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/name/dr-maureen-henderson-obituary?pid=161519812

“Social and Preventive Medicine.” (1974). Bulletin of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. 59(4): 2-3. Retrieved from: https://archive.org/details/bulletinofuniver5959/page/3/mode/2up

“Woman Heads Department.” (1972). Bulletin of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. 57(4): 16-17. Retrieved from: https://archive.org/details/bulletinofuniver5757/page/n57/mode/2up.

 

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Meet Online With Your Librarian!

Librarians from the Health Sciences and Human Services Library are happy to meet online, via Webex, for research consultations.

We can help with your literature search, teach you to use a citation manager, collaborate on your systematic review, and more.

Make an appointment!

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HS/HSL E-books – Unlimited Access

E-books owned by the HS/HSL which only have a few simultaneous users now have unlimited access thanks to ProQuest and EBSCO. They have been working with a growing list of publishers to make this possible. The extended access will be available from ProQuest through June 19, and from EBSCO through June 30.

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Anna F. Clancy & E. Grace Lotz: Early Women Graduates, School of Pharmacy, Class of 1906

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library Historical Collections’ strives to provide broad access to our diverse collections both in person and digitally. Materials in our collections appear as they originally were published or created and may contain offensive or inappropriate language or images and may be offensive to users. The University of Maryland, Baltimore does not endorse the views expressed in these materials. Materials should be viewed in the context within they were created.

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy traces its history back to 1841 with the foundation of the Maryland College of Pharmacy (MCP).  The University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) formed its own department of Pharmacy in 1882.  In 1904 the MCP and the UMSOM’s pharmacy department merged to form the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (UMSOP).  The first woman to graduate from the MCP was Dr. Lady Mary Johnson in 1898, because of the intertwined history of the MCP and UMSOP she is celebrated as the first woman graduate of the School of Pharmacy. 

Anna Francis Clancy and Elizabeth Grace Lotz, received their degree in Pharmacy in 1906, thus becoming the first woman graduates of the new UMSOP.  According to the Terra Mariae Yearbook of 1906 the two women were close friends.  Clancy even worked at Lotz’ family store during their senior year.  There is little evidence of their time at the school; however, the yearbook gives some hints as to their treatment or standing with fellow male students.  The Yearbook superlatives for both girls mentions potential interest by a “bachelor professor,” a concern never expressed before. 

Photograph of Anna Francis Clancy, School of Pharmacy Class of 1906

Anna Francis Clancy graduation photograph from School of Pharmacy Class of 1906 from the Terra Mariae Yearbook.

Anna Francis Clancy

Anna Francis Clancy was from Genesee, PA.  Following graduation, she moved to Buffalo, New York where she was granted her druggist license.  According to an article on the history of women pharmacists at the University of Maryland in The Pharmaceutical Era of 1912, Clancy was “still with the same firm and [was] giving such great satisfaction to her employer that he says he would never be without a lady in his store.”  It appears that Anna Francis Clancy was an excellent representative of the school and women pharmacists.

Photograph of E. Grace Lotz, University of Maryland, School of Pharmacy Graduate 1906

Elizabeth Grace Lotz graduation photograph from School of Pharmacy Class of 1906 from the Terra Mariae Yearbook.

Elizabeth Grace Lotz

Dr. Elizabeth Grace Lotz was born and raised in Baltimore Maryland.  Her father owned the William H. Lotz Store on Warner and Conway Streets in Baltimore; as a result, E. Grace Lotz showed an early interest in pharmacy.  Lotz earned the first General Prize from the School of Pharmacy at graduation.  Throughout her career, Lotz served as the druggist at Union Memorial Hospital, taught pharmacy to nurses at the schools of nursing in the city, and taught chemistry at the Women’s Medical College of Baltimore.  Dr. Lotz married Louis Kahler.  Dr. Lotz Kahler passed away in 1967.

Dr. Lotz was a woman leader in pharmacy.  In addition to her academic and professional work, she served as the first honorary president of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Maryland Pharmaceutical Association.  The 1912 Pharmaceutical Era had the following to say about Dr. Lotz Kahler:

“Miss Lotz is an example of what a woman can ‘be in pharmacy, as she has been extremely successful both as a teacher and as a pharmacist. While she considers the presence of a woman necessary to the conduction of every good, up-to-date drug store, she does not feel that women should take the place of men in this business, but that the two should work together, as there are many things in this profession for which women are better adapted than men, and vice versa.”

Clancy and Lotz represent trailblazers for other women in the school of pharmacy.  Together with other notable graduates like Dr. B. Olive Cole they opened doorways for women to successfully complete their degree in Pharmacy.  Women in the School of Pharmacy remained a minority until the 1980s when they began to equal or outnumber male students.  This trend mimics the national trend according to a study by pharmacy students Brittany and Catherine Botescu studying the history of women in pharmacy and analyzing data from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.

Graph indicating the rise of female pharmacy graduates from 1940 to 2010 at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy

Percentages of Women School of Pharmacy graduates. From study by Catherine and Brittany Botescu, 2019.

References:

Botescu, C. and B. Botescu. (2019). “An Assessment of Female Representation Among Maryland Pharmacy.” Study for Pharmacy Coursework, University of Maryland, School of Pharmacy.

Terra Mariae. (1906). Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/2462

Wallace, E.G. (1912). “Women in Pharmacy (Addenda).” The Pharmaceutical Era. D.O. Haynes, New York: 774-777. Retrieved from: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000502820

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Dr. Florence Meda Gipe, First Dean of the School of Nursing, 1952-1966

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library Historical Collections’ strives to provide broad access to our diverse collections both in person and digitally. Materials in our collections appear as they originally were published or created and may contain offensive or inappropriate language or images and may be offensive to users. The University of Maryland, Baltimore does not endorse the views expressed in these materials. Materials should be viewed in the context within they were created.

Photograph of Dr. Florence M. Gipe, 1966

Photograph of Dr. Florence M. Gipe from the 1966 Pledge Yearbook.

Continuing the Women’s History Month celebration is Dr. Florence Meda Gipe. Dr.  Gipe was born in York, Pennsylvania in September 1895 to John W. and Mary Ella Gipe.  She had two siblings, Edith M. and William Gipe.  Gipe graduated from the York Hospital School of Nursing in 1919, receiving highest honors.  She continued her education at the Catholic University of America (BS), the University of Pennsylvania (MS), and the University of Maryland, College Park (Ed.D).  

I assure you that with your strong cooperation, we will become a school of national importance.  
Florence M. Gipe writing in the Bulletin of the Nurses’ Alumnae Association, 1947, Living History Museum Virtual Tour Website

Dr. Gipe joined the University of Maryland as the Director of Nursing Service and Nursing Education at the University Hospital in February 1946 after serving in several educational and director positions at nursing training schools at York Hospital, Providence Hospital and Reading Hospital.  After accepting the role of director, Dr. Gipe began to challenge the existing educational standards of the University Hospital’s Nursing Training School.  She believed nursing education should move towards more traditional academic methods away from the existing training model; in other words, she proposed nursing schools have more formal lectures, group discussions, and theory in addition to hands-on clinical training.  She was angered by the menial tasks traditionally assigned to nurses and wanted the profession to undertake more challenging responsibilities such as taking blood pressure or give injections.  

Dr. Gipe’s vision for Maryland became a reality in May 1952 when the School of Nursing became an autonomous college in the University rather than under control of the University Hospital.  The Hospital would remain an important site for clinical learning but this change allowed the school to offer a four-year bachelor’s degree in Nursing—the first in the state of Maryland.  Dr. Gipe’s hard work and dedication to nursing education also lead to the development of the Master of Science Degree in Nursing at the school, which began in 1954—also the first graduate degree in nursing in the state. By 1957, both programs (undergraduate and graduate) were fully accredited by the National League for Nursing.   

In addition to her work at the University of Maryland, Dr. Gipe served with the Nursing Council of the Southern Regional Education Board.  Through this group she helped to set guidelines for graduate programs in Nursing throughout the Southern United States.  Dr. Gipe retired from the University of Maryland School of Nursing in June 1966 but continued to consult with Franklin Square Hospital, Nursing Hospital and South Baltimore General Hospital. She received an honorary degree from York College in 1979.  Dr. Gipe passed away June 12, 1983 in York after complications from a car accident in May 1983.  

References: 

“Dean Gipe and a New Academic Model: 1952-1965.” (2018). History of the School of Nursing Website. Retrieved from: https://www.nursing.umaryland.edu/museum/virtual-tour/foundation/new-model/.  

“Diplomas for Seven Nurses at Hospital.” (16 May 1919). The York Dispatch. York, PA: 3.  

“First nursing dean dies.” (27 June 1983). Happenings. Baltimore: 3. Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/10089.  

“Florence Gipe, 1st UM nursing dean, dies.” (15 June 1983). The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore: F7.  

Innovation in Action: The University of Maryland School of Nursing from its Founding in 1889 to 2012. (2014). Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/7106.  

Pledge. (1966) Retrieved from: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/455 

Ruffner, J. (2 June 2009). “A Golden Look Back.” University of Maryland Nursing. Baltimore: 16-17. Retrieved from: https://issuu.com/umson/docs/university_of_maryland_nursing/19  

 

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HS/HSL’s Response to COVID-19

  • Beginning March 14th, the LIbrary is closed until further notice.
  • Online services and resources will continue to be available.  For more information click here.

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