HS/HSL seeks COVID-19 Stories and Experiences from UMB Community

In an effort to capture the UMB Community’s experiences during the current pandemic for future researchers Historical Collections in the Health Sciences and Human Services Library has launched a project: UnMasking a Pandemic: Stories from UMB during COVID-19.  The project aims to collect stories, photographs, blogs, videos, etc. from across the UMB Community about the COVID-19 Pandemic.  Members of the campus community at all levels (staff, faculty, students, etc.) are encouraged to participate in this project.  The HS/HSL is interested in receiving items of personal reflection, creative work, or anything that documents your thoughts, emotions, and experiences during this incredible time.

We are accepting:

  • journal entries
  • personal essays
  • poems, short stories, etc.
  • photographs (or other visual art pieces)
  • music or other audio recordings
  • videos
  • screenshots of personal websites, blogs, or social media post

To participate please see the Project’s Website and fill out the Survey to submit any items.  If you have any questions or would like to submit physical items to our collections please contact, Tara Wink, Historical Collections Librarian and Archivist. 

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NIH “All of Us” Research Program Begins Beta Testing of Data Platform: Researchers Invited to Give Feedback

National Institute's of Health All Of Us Research Program

In partnership with our participants—now nearly 350,000 and counting—we’re working to build one of the world’s largest and most diverse datasets to advance health research. Today, we’re happy to announce that we’ve opened our research platform, the All of Us Researcher Workbench, for beta testing. Now, researchers can begin using our initial dataset and tools in studies and tell us what’s working and what we can improve. This moment is an important step in our effort to accelerate new discoveries. 

View the full NIH announcement here.

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Virtual Library Resources & Services Over the Summer

zinnias

Virtual HS/HSL services and resources will remain unchanged during the Library’s Summer Session, which runs from Tuesday, May 26 – Sunday, August 16.  The one exception is that there will be no Reference Service on Sundays beginning May 31.  

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Reference Service is Closed for the Memorial Day Holiday, May 23, 24, 25

flags with text Memorial Day, Celebrate, Honor, Remember

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Include Your Data in the UMB Data Catalog!

Do you have a dataset you’ve been meaning to share, but just haven’t gotten around to it? Now is a perfect time!

Results of a recent survey on how life scientists have adapted to COVID-19 restrictions indicate that 43% of respondents are spending more time on data analysis.


Figure taken from Korbel and Stegle (2020).

The task may seem daunting, but we at the HS/HSL are here to help! Contact us if you want to talk about:

Finding the right repository: There is an ever-increasing number of options out there for sharing and storing data. We can help you sort through these options, and find an appropriate fit for your data that takes into account funding or publisher requirements, discipline, size, privacy requirements, data type and more!

Creating documentation for your data: Don’t send your data out into the wild without a good description. We can help you craft a README file or data dictionary to add context to your dataset. Well-described data is happy data!

Listing your data in the UMB Data Catalog: The UMB Data Catalog is a resource that aims to facilitate the discovery of datasets created by or used by UMB researchers. The catalog is not a repository to store datasets; it describes them. By having a record for your dataset in the Data Catalog, you can increase the visibility of your research on campus and beyond. Datasets are discoverable through a search in the UMB Data Catalog, Google’s Dataset Search (beta) and Google. Use the link to your dataset record in articles, CVs, and your web profile.

Read more about Bioinformation and Data Services at the HS/HSL.

Request a consultation or submit your dataset to the Data Catalog.

References

Korbel, J.O., Stegle, O. Effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on life scientists. Genome Biol 21, 113 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13059-020-02031-1

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HS/HSL Resources After Graduation

As the academic year comes to a close, the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) would like our graduating students to know what resources they can use after graduation.

  • Journals and databases: Alumni are able to access HS/HSL’s electronic resources off campus for two months after graduation. 
  • Free databases: Once your electronic access expires, you still will have access to public databases for literature, drug information, and more. A few examples are highlighted below. Additionally, be sure to investigate what resources you have through your new workplace and any professional organizations of which you are a member.
  • Citation managers: Mendeley and Zotero are free options available to manage your citations. To see how their features compare, visit our Citation Managers page.

Freely Available Databases

Type of Information

Can Be Used in Place of

PubMed

Literature

Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, etc.

Google Scholar

Literature

Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, etc.

NLM Drug Information Portal

Drug Information

Micromedex, Lexicomp, Natural Medicines

MedlinePlus

Patient-Friendly Health Information

Micromedex, Lexicomp, UpToDate, Natural Medicines

National Guideline Clearinghouse

Clinical Practice Guidelines

UpToDate

TRIP Database

Literature

Embase, CINAHL, Ovid MEDLINE

NCBI Databases

Various – literature, chemical information, genetic/genomic information, etc.

SciFinder, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, etc.

Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

Literature

Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, etc.

The HS/HSL wishes UMB graduates all the best in their future endeavors! Please contact the Information Services Desk if you have any questions.

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The Legacy of Florence Nightingale at UMB

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library Historical Collections’ strives to provide broad access to our diverse collections both in person and digitally. Materials in our collections appear as they originally were published or created and may contain offensive or inappropriate language or images and may be offensive to users. The University of Maryland, Baltimore does not endorse the views expressed in these materials. Materials should be viewed in the context in which they were created.

Louisa Parsons, First Superintendent of the University Training School for Nurses, 1889-1892

Louisa Parsons, first Superintendent of the University Hospital Training School for Nurses, the precursor of the School of Nursing.

May 12, 2020 marks the 200th birthday of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing.  UMB’s School of Nursing has ties to Nightingale through its founder Louisa Parsons, an 1880 graduate of the Nightingale Training School for Nurses at the St. Thomas Hospital in London, which was founded by Florence Nightingale in 1860.  The Florence Nightingale Cap was a tradition introduced by Parsons during her two-year term as the superintendent of the University Hospital Training School for Nurses. According to reports in the Nurses Alumnae Association Bulletin, the pattern of the “Flossie,” as the cap is lovingly referred, was given to Parsons by Nightingale to use when Parsons founded her first nursing school.

Flossie Nurse Cap

The University of Maryland School of Nursing Nightingale Cap or “Flossie”

The cap was a signal to the Nursing School Graduates of their professionalism and they wore it proudly. An early graduate, Mary E. Cornman, Class of 1893 fondly remembered receiving her Flossie directly from Superintendent Parsons.

“I remember going to my rooms one night in the third week of March, 1891, and finding there the material for two uniforms and lace sufficient for two caps. The crowns of the caps were already cut out and the lace cut into proper lengths for both ruffles—2 ¾ yards in the lower one (to go entirely around the crown), and 2 ¼ yards in the upper ruffle. The caps we first and second class nurses wore were larger in the crown than those worn now and the lace was sent from England.”

Poem from the Nurses Alumnae Association Bulletin about the importance of cleaning the Flossie.

The Nightingale cap was traditionally made from point d’estprit lace, which was imported from England.  By 1900, it was simplified by then Superintendent Catherine A. Taylor to make it easier to clean and wear.  In the 1930s, the lace became harder to find so a simplified netting was approved for use by the Nursing Alumnae Association, the overseers of the Nightingale Cap.  The Associations’ Bulletins routinely printed ads for purchase or laundering of the cap because it required special fluting tools and lace. 

The Flossie is a proud tradition for SON alumni.  Early on, senior students, in their final weeks of coursework, were shown how to string their caps in capping ceremonies.  In later years students were taught how to flute their caps, during a six-week probationary period.  If they were able to successfully flute the cap, the student could continue studies.  These ceremonies were known as fluting ceremonies and continued into the 1980s.  These fluting ceremonies eventually included skits and songs by the upper-class nurses. 

Images from the Pledge Yearbooks of cap fluting and stringing from 1964 (upper left), 1965 (bottom left), and 1983 (right).

To celebrate UMB’s Nursing Alumni Association’s 100th Anniversary (see page 19). a Flossie was donated to the Smithsonian Institute.  It remains a permanent item in the Institute’s collection. 

For many SON graduates, the Nightingale cap is a reminder of their role in a proud tradition of nursing.  It ties them to the University of Maryland School of Nursing, its founder, Louisa Parsons, and Florence Nightingale.  Years after graduating from the University Hospital Training School, Cornman, still respected her Flossie and its symbolism.  She stated:

“As Miss Parsons adjusted my cap, she placed it about 1 1/2 inches beyond my forehead—and so I still wear it. A cap is a badge of service and when we consider all our cap means to us, we should want to wear it so that it will show, almost as a crown! This position for our cap should never have been changed. By wearing it in this dignified manner we show with pride our pleasure in ministering to minds and bodies diseased or broken in the rush of life.”

The year 2020, marks Nightingale’s 200th Birthday.  To honor her memory and influence, this year has been designated the International Year of the Nurse.  UMB’s School of Nursing is an integral part of the proud tradition of nursing in Maryland and beyond. 

 

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Celebrate the end of the academic year with a gift from the HS/HSL!

Image of the "Hundred-Leaved Rose" partially colored

Rosa Centifolia or the Hundred-Leaved Rose from William Woodville’s “Medical Botany”.

It’s the end of the semester, during a global pandemic, things are stressful for everyone, everywhere!  We at the HS/HSL hope this delightful coloring book of charming botanical images from our Historical Collections will help to ease stress and anxiety.  Images in the coloring book are scanned from William Woodville’s “Medical Botany” and William Withering’s “An Account of the Foxglove,” a gift from Dr. Mordecai and Ellen Blaustein.    We invite you to download, print, and color your worries away! 

We miss you all, so please share your masterpieces with us on Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram). 

Link to the coloring book: https://www2.hshsl.umaryland.edu/HSHSLDigitalColoringBook.pdf

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Baltimore Sun Wins Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting: How Do I Read it Online?

Photo: Baltimore Sun: Light for All, by Brent Payne, licensed under CC BY-SA

The Library is often asked about how to read newspapers like the Baltimore Sun, New York Times, and Washington Post online. It’s simple, search our database list for National Newspapers Core & Baltimore Sun.

One important caveat to note is that articles published digitally must be indexed before they appear in the newspaper database, so they may not be available until the following day.

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Recognizing Nurses with a historic poem this National Nurses Week

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library Historical Collections’ strives to provide broad access to our diverse collections both in person and digitally. Materials in our collections appear as they originally were published or created and may contain offensive or inappropriate language or images and may be offensive to users. The University of Maryland, Baltimore does not endorse the views expressed in these materials. Materials should be viewed in the context in which they were created.

As COVID-19 confines thousands to hospitals around the country, nurses are in high demand.  The UMB School of Nursing has answered this call by offering qualifying May 2020 graduates an “early exit” opportunity. The early exit was announced April 27, 2020 and allows newly minted BSN and CNL nurses to join the workforce and help fight COVID-19 in local Baltimore hospitals.  While it may not be the commencement celebration these nurses had in mind when they started their education, many are answering the call and jumping headfirst into the COVID-19 fight. 

Gentle Nurses Poem from the 1905 Yearbook

“Gentle Nurses” poem in the 1905 Bones, Molars, and Briefs Yearbook.

In the midst of this global pandemic falls National Nurses Week, May 6 to 12, 2020.  During this monumental time the HS/HSL wishes to show our thanks to our UMB nurses past and present with a fitting poem from the 1905 Bones, Molars, and Briefs Yearbook.  We know nurses on the front lines of this illness are all experiencing “endless, sleepless nights,” soothing your “fever racked” patients through “fitful dreams” and “throbbing brain”, and blissfully cheering on all those lucky enough to have “health and strength return.”  For so many patients today, you are their sole cheerleader and adopted loved one, so for “as long as gratitude shall live,” we thank you.

The “Gentle Nurses” poem was featured in the 1905 Bones, Molars, and Briefs Yearbook.  The Yearbook was curated by students of the Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Law, and Pharmacy.  Some early yearbooks also featured the graduating classes of the University Hospital Nurses Training School, a predecessor of today’s School of Nursing; however, the 1905 Yearbook includes no mention or photograph of the students in this school, only the Gentle Nurses poem hints at the nurses training in the same hospital as medical students and faculty.  Early yearbooks commonly featured the poetry, literature, satire, and art pieces of students at the University and provide excellent glimpses into the culture of the time period.  Please view the content in the UMB yearbooks and shared in this Blog within this light. 

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